Tag Archive: Earthquakes


By Christina Consolo – Host of  Nuked Radio
theintelhub.com
April 21, 2012

Thirteen months have passed since the Fukushima reactors exploded, and a U.S. Senator finally got off his ass and went to Japan to see what is going on over there.

What he saw was horrific.

And now he is saying that we are in big trouble.

See the letter he sent to U.S. Ambassador to Japan Ichiro Fujisaki, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and NRC’s Chairman Gregory Jaczko here.

But what is so ironic about this is that we have been in this heap of trouble since March of 2011. March 17th, to be exact, when the plume of radioactive materials began bombarding the west coast of California.

And Oregon. And Washington. And British Columbia. And later Maine, Europe, and everywhere in between.

Independent researchers, nuke experts, and scientists, from oceanography to entomology and everywhere in between, having been trying to sound the alarm ever since.

The scientists most upset are those who have studied the effects of radiation on health. I’ll say it again, so its really clear: we are in big trouble.

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It seems as if every month now there’s at least one earthquake somewhere in the world, that’s devastating people lives and their communities. Recently, many visitors to this blog have used it to find out a little more information about the Richter Scale.

Here’s another link to a resource that may be helpful or of interest to you. It’s a interactive map from the US Geological Survey and earthquake monitors Iris shows every quake for the past two weeks. It’s constantly updated – and the centre provides complete datasets too. Please click on the link below:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/interactive/2011/feb/22/earthquake-map-world

The Richter scale is a logarithmic scale used to express the total amount of energy released by an earthquake. Its values typically fall between 0 and 9, with each increase of 1 representing a 10-fold increase in energy.

Wikipedia info:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richter_magnitude_scale

 

Size and Frequency of Occurrence.

There are around 500,000 earthquakes each year. About 100,000 of these can actually be felt.  Minor earthquakes occur nearly constantly around the world in places like California and Alaska in the U.S., as well as in Guatemala. Chile, Peru, Indonesia, Iran, Pakistan, the Azores in Portugal, Turkey, New Zealand, Greece, Italy, and Japan, but earthquakes can occur almost anywhere, including New York City, London, and Australia.

Larger earthquakes occur less frequently, the relationship being exponential; for example, roughly ten times as many earthquakes larger than magnitude 4 occur in a particular time period than earthquakes larger than magnitude 5. In the (low seismicity) United Kingdom, for example, it has been calculated that the average recurrences are: an earthquake of 3.7 – 4.6 every year, an earthquake of 4.7 – 5.5 every 10 years, and an earthquake of 5.6 or larger every 100 years. This is an example of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

 

 

RECENT EARTHQUAKE HISTORY:

Thank you to Liz for this one. Here’s a link to a website that hosts data of all the earthquakes globally over the last seven days:  http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Quakes/quakes_all.php

Source: http://uk.news.yahoo.com/21/20110123/tuk-quake-recorded-in-west-of-scotland-6323e80.html

Quake recorded in west of Scotland.

A small earthquake has hit the west of Scotland, the British Geological Survey said.

The quake measured 3.5 on the Richter scale and was recorded in Glenuig, west of Fort William, at 6.02am on Sunday.

It was felt in Skye, Mull, Inverness and Oban and is the largest earthquake recorded in the area since January 2008, when a tremor of the same magnitude was recorded near Glenfinnan.

The survey said such an earthquake can be felt as far as 120 km away. One person reported being awoken by “noise and vibration” during the quake.

Glenuig is a remote village of around 30 residents in Moidart, west Lochaber. Until the mid-1960s the community could only be reached by foot or by boat.

A quake of 3.5 is classed as minor and no one reported any damage in the area after it happened.

Northern England has been shaken by two earthquakes in recent weeks. One measuring 3.6 on the Richter scale struck near Ripon, North Yorkshire, on January 3 and was felt as far afield as West Yorkshire, Tyne & Wear and Cumbria.

The rumble came after a quake of magnitude 3.5 which hit Coniston in the Lake District on December 21.

Steve MacFarlane, director of the Glenuig Inn, said he was awoken by the tremor which he says created a crack in the hotel’s car park.

He said: “I thought I was having a dream. I woke up and the dog woke up but then I went back to sleep. When I got up later I had a Google alert telling me there had been an earthquake.”

 

Other recent UK earthquakes: