Tag Archive: New Technology


Episode 1 – The Band of Peace

The Band of Peace raises questions about the purpose of the pyramids challenging the story traditional Egyptology tells. See rare footage of 6 distinct pyramid sites near the Great Pyramid with evidence of superior technology and sophisticated knowledge of physics, astronomy, biology, and cosmology.

Episode 2 – High Level Technology

High Level Technology shows evidence that the ancient Egptians used sophisticated engineering and high science to construct pyramids and temples. Scientists discuss the source of this power and its applications in the ancient world. Our science is just beginning to grasp what the ancients clearly understood long ago.

Episode 3 – Sacred Cosmology

Sacred Cosmology offers a new way of interpreting hieroglyphics and demonstrates that the ancients understood physics, biology, and celestial mechanics. On an expedition through the open desert to a site of extreme antiquity called Nabta Playa, neolithic stone circles mark the motion of the same stars as were tracked in pharonic civilization.

Episode 4 – The Empowered Human

The Empowered Human proposes that the pyramid builders were living in a Golden Age, they had more refined senses, experienced higher levels of consciousness which gave them superior abilities than we have today. The sacred feminine was honored and existed in balance with the sacred masculine.

Episode 5 – A New Chronology

A New Chronology posits, after examining the evidence presented in the series, that the dates given by traditional Egyptology do not fit. Carefully considering cycles of time through the Gold, Silver, Bronze, and Iron Ages of Plato’s Great Year, a new chronology is emerging that illuminates secrets of ancient Egypt.

http://www.pyramidcode.com/Episodes.html

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1362331/CeBIT-2011-Coming-soon-eye-tracking-technology-allow-control-sight.html

Date: 2nd March 2011

Coming soon, the eye-tracking technology that will allow you to control your computer by sight

A laptop prototype has been unveiled with device which could allow users to control their computers by sight – and could make them even faster to use, according to the inventors.

The eye-tracking technology monitors the user’s gaze and works out where they’re looking on the computer screen and means, among other things, that users can play a game where they defeat enemies because the game’s lasers hit where they look. It can also scroll text on the screen in response to eye movements, sensing when the reader has reached the end of the visible text.

In the future, such a laptop could make the mouse cursor appear where they user is looking, or make a game character maintain eye contact, according to Tobii Technology Inc, the Swedish firm behind the tracking technology.

Now planned for commercial use, the eye tracker works by shining two invisible infrared lights at the user. Two hidden cameras then look for the ‘glints’ from eyeballs and reflections from each retina. It needs to be calibrated for each person, and works for those with or without glasses.

Continue reading

Source: www.insidescience.org
Date: 7th September, 2010

Tractor beams and energy rays that can move objects were a science fiction mainstay. But now they are becoming a reality – at least for moving very tiny objects.

Researchers from the Australian National University have announced that they have built a device that can move small particles a meter and a half using only the power of light.

Physicists have been able to manipulate tiny particles over miniscule distances by using lasers for years. Optical tweezers that can move particles a few millimeters are common.

Andrei Rode, a researcher involved with the project, said that existing optical tweezers are able to move particles the size of a bacterium a few millimeters in a liquid. Their new technique can move objects one hundred times that size over a distance of a meter or more.

The device works by shining a hollow laser beam around tiny glass particles. The air surrounding the particle heats up, while the dark center of the beam stays cool. When the particle starts to drift out of the middle and into the bright laser beam, the force of heated air molecules bouncing around and hitting the particle’s surface is enough to nudge it back to the center.

A small amount of light also seeps into the darker middle part of the beam, heating the air on one side of the particle and pushing it along the length of the laser beam. If another such laser is lined up on the opposite side of the beam, the speed and direction the particle moves can be easily manipulated by changing the brightness of the beams.

Rode said that their technique could likely work over even longer distances than they tested.

“With the particles and the laser we use, I would guess up to 10 meters in air should not be a problem. The max distance we had was 1.5 meters, which was limited by the size of the optical table in the lab,” Rode said.

Because this technique needs heated gas to push the particles around, it can’t work in the vacuum of outer space like the tractor beams in Star Trek. But on Earth there are many possible applications for the technology. The meter-long distances that the research team was able to move the particles could open up new avenues for laser tweezers in the transport of dangerous substances and microbes, and for sample taking and biomedical research.

“There is the possibility that one could use the hollow spheres as a means of chemical delivery agents, or microscopic containers of some kind, but some more work would need to be done here just to check what happens inside the spheres, in terms of sample heating,” said David McGloin, a physicist at the University of Dundee in the U.K not connected with the Australian team.